Uses and the Occurrence of all Vitamins

Articles Health

Vitamins A:

The best sources of vitamins A are:
  • Cod liver oil.
  • Eggs.
  • Fortified breakfast cereals.
  • Fortified skim milk.
  • Orange and yellow vegetables and fruits.
  • Other sources of beta-carotene such as broccoli, spinach, and most dark green, leafy vegetables.
Vitamin A is important for normal vision, the immune system, and reproduction. Vitamin A also helps the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs work properly. There are two different types of vitamin A. The first type, preformed vitamin A, is found in meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.

Vitamin B2:

Food Sources
  • Dairy milk.
  • Yogurt.
  • Cheese.
  • Eggs.
  • Lean beef and pork.
  • Organ meats (beef liver)
  • Chicken breast.
  • Salmon.
Vitamin B2 helps break down proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. It plays a vital role in maintaining the body’s energy supply. Riboflavin helps convert carbohydrates into adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The human body produces ATP from food, and ATP produces energy as the body requires it.

Vitamin B5:

Food Sources
  • Fortified cereals.
  • Organ meats (liver, kidney)
  • Beef.
  • Chicken breast.
  • Mushrooms.
  • Avocado.
  • Nuts, seeds.
  • Dairy milk.
Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is one of the most important vitamins for human life. It’s necessary for making blood cells, and it helps you convert the food you eat into energy. Vitamin B5 is one of eight B vitamins. All B vitamins help you convert the protein, carbohydrates, and fats you eat into energy.

Vitamin B6:

Good sources of vitamin B6
  • pork.
  • poultry, such as chicken or turkey.
  • some fish.
  • peanuts.
  • soya beans.
  • wheatgerm.
  • oats.
  • bananas.
 
Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, is a water-soluble vitamin that your body needs for several functions. It’s significant to protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism and the creation of red blood cells and neurotransmitters (1). Your body cannot produce vitamin B6, so you must obtain it from foods or supplements.

Vitamin B12:

Vitamin B12 is naturally found in animal products, including fish, meat, poultry, eggsmilk, and milk products. Vitamin B12 is generally not present in plant foods, but fortified breakfast cereals are a readily available source of vitamin B12 with high bioavailability for vegetarians.
 

Vitamin B12 is a nutrient that helps keep the body’s nerve and blood cells healthy and helps make DNA, the genetic material in all cells. Vitamin B12 also helps prevent a type of anemia called megaloblastic anemia that makes people tired and weak.

Vitamin C:

Good sources of vitamin C
  • citrus fruit, such as oranges and orange juice.
  • peppers.
  • strawberries.
  • blackcurrants.
  • broccoli.
  • brussels sprouts.
  • potatoes.
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is necessary for the growth, development, and repair of all body tissues. It’s involved in many body functions, including the formation of collagen, absorption of iron, the proper functioning of the immune system, wound healing, and the maintenance of cartilage, bones, and teeth.

Vitamin D:

Good sources of vitamin D
  • oily fish – such as salmonsardinesherring, and mackerel.
  • red meat.
  • liver.
  • egg yolks.
  • fortified foods – such as some fat spreads and breakfast cereals.

The major biological function of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones.

Vitamin E:

Vitamin E is found in plant-based oils, nutsseedsfruits, and vegetables.
  • Wheat germ oil.
  • Sunflower, safflower, and soybean oil.
  • Sunflower seeds.
  • Almonds.
  • Peanuts, peanut butter.
  • Beet greens, collard greens, spinach.
  • Pumpkin.
  • Red bell pepper.
What is vitamin E and what does it do? Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient found in many foods. In the body, it acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are compounds formed when our bodies convert the food we eat into energy.

Vitamin K:

The most common sources of vitamin K in the U.S. diet are spinach; broccoli; iceberg lettuce; and fats and oils, particularly soybean and canola oil 
Vitamin K refers to a group of fat-soluble vitamins that play a role in blood clotting, bone metabolism, and regulating blood calcium levels. The body needs vitamin K to produce prothrombin, a protein, and clotting factor that is important in blood clotting and bone metabolism.
Want more Articles like this one…?

If you want to read more articles like this one, click the button below to visit the page where you will find the best collection of articles on health, science, poetry, etc.

Read More Articles

 

Want to publish your post on AlifAdab?

If you want to publish your posts, ideas, thoughts, and feedback. Then click the button below. It will redirect you to another page. Where you can easily create your post and submit it. After reviewing your post, we will approve and publish it on this site if it follows our policies and terms. Your post will be issued within 24 hours after submission.

Create Your Post

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.